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Sebastian Ross
Sebastian Ross

Brain Over Binge: How to End Your Binge Eating Habit with Neuroscience and Psychology


Brain Over Binge: A Revolutionary Approach to Ending Bulimia and Binge Eating Disorder




Introduction




If you struggle with binge eating, you might feel like you have no control over your behavior. You might feel ashamed, guilty, and hopeless about your situation. You might have tried various therapies, diets, and self-help books, but nothing seems to work. You might wonder if there is a way out of this vicious cycle.




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Well, there is. And it's simpler than you think.


In this article, we will introduce you to a book called Brain Over Binge, written by Kathryn Hansen. This book offers a revolutionary approach to ending bulimia and binge eating disorder, based on neuroscience, psychology, and personal experience. We will explain what Brain Over Binge is, who the author is, and what are the main concepts and principles of this approach. We will also show you how Brain Over Binge can help you stop binge eating, what are the benefits and challenges of following this approach, and how to find support and resources for your recovery.


By the end of this article, you will have a better understanding of Brain Over Binge and how it can change your life for the better. You will also have some practical tips and tools to start applying this approach right away.


Are you ready to take back control over your brain and your binge eating? Then let's get started!


What is Brain Over Binge?




What is Brain Over Binge?




Brain Over Binge is a book that was published in 2011 by Kathryn Hansen. It is a self-help guide that teaches people how to stop binge eating by using a simple but powerful technique: dismissing their binge urges as meaningless neurological junk.


The book is based on the idea that binge eating is not caused by deep-rooted emotional issues, personality flaws, or lack of willpower. Rather, it is caused by a malfunction in the brain that creates strong urges to overeat. These urges are generated by the lower brain, which is responsible for survival instincts and habits. The lower brain does not care about your health, happiness, or goals. It only cares about getting more food, especially high-calorie foods that provide quick energy.


The good news is that you have another part of your brain that can override these urges: the higher brain. The higher brain is responsible for rational thinking, planning, decision-making, and self-control. The higher brain can see the big picture and align your actions with your values. The higher brain can also learn new habits and rewire the lower brain over time.


The key to stopping binge eating, according to Brain Over Binge, is to use your higher brain to dismiss your binge urges as irrelevant and harmless. By doing this, you will stop giving power and attention to the lower brain, and you will weaken the neural pathways that trigger binge eating. Eventually, your binge urges will fade away and you will be free from binge eating.


Who is the author and what is her story?




The author of Brain Over Binge is Kathryn Hansen, a former bulimic who recovered from her disorder using the technique she describes in the book. She is not a doctor, therapist, or nutritionist. She is just a regular person who suffered from binge eating for six years and found a way out of it.


Kathryn's story began when she was 18 years old and started dieting to lose weight. She became obsessed with counting calories and restricting her food intake. She also started exercising excessively to burn off the calories she consumed. She lost a lot of weight, but she also developed anorexia nervosa, a serious eating disorder characterized by extreme fear of gaining weight and distorted body image.


After a few months of starving herself, Kathryn's body rebelled and she experienced her first binge episode. She ate a large amount of food in a short period of time, feeling out of control and unable to stop. She felt horrible after the binge, both physically and emotionally. She vowed to never do it again, but she couldn't keep her promise. She soon fell into a cycle of bingeing and purging, using methods such as vomiting, laxatives, and fasting to get rid of the calories she ingested during the binges. She developed bulimia nervosa, another serious eating disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of binge eating followed by compensatory behaviors to prevent weight gain.


Kathryn tried to overcome her bulimia by seeking professional help. She went to several therapists and counselors, but none of them could help her. They all focused on the underlying psychological causes of her binge eating, such as low self-esteem, stress, trauma, or family issues. They also advised her to eat normally and follow a balanced diet. However, none of these approaches worked for Kathryn. She felt like they were missing the point. She didn't binge because she had emotional problems or because she didn't know how to eat properly. She binged because she had uncontrollable urges to overeat that she couldn't resist.


Kathryn finally found the solution to her problem when she came across a book called Rational Recovery, written by Jack Trimpey. This book teaches people how to overcome addiction by using their rational mind to reject their addictive urges. Kathryn realized that binge eating was similar to addiction, and that she could apply the same technique to stop her binge urges. She decided to give it a try, and it worked. She stopped bingeing and purging for good, without any therapy, medication, or dieting. She regained her health, happiness, and freedom.


Kathryn decided to share her story and her technique with others who suffer from binge eating disorders. She wrote Brain Over Binge to help people understand the true nature of their binge urges and how to dismiss them effectively. She also created a website, a podcast, a blog, and an online course to provide more information and support for people who want to follow her approach.


What are the main concepts and principles of Brain Over Binge?




The main concepts and principles of Brain Over Binge are summarized in five simple steps:



  • View your binge urges as neurological junk from your lower brain.



  • Separate your higher brain from your lower brain.



  • Stop reacting to your lower brain and start responding with your higher brain.



  • Dismiss your urges as meaningless and powerless.



  • Stop acting on your urges and start acting on your true goals.



Let's look at each step in more detail:



  • View your binge urges as neurological junk from your lower brain. The first step is to change the way you perceive your binge urges. Instead of seeing them as valid signals that you need or want food, see them as faulty messages that have no relevance or importance for you. Your binge urges are not coming from your true self, but from a primitive part of your brain that is malfunctioning due to years of dieting and bingeing. Your lower brain does not know what is best for you; it only knows what it has learned through repetition and reward. It has learned that bingeing on high-calorie foods provides temporary relief from hunger, stress, or negative emotions. It has also learned that restricting food intake triggers more hunger and more binge urges. Therefore, it keeps sending you these urges whenever it senses any sign of deprivation or discomfort.



How Brain Over Binge Can Help You Stop Binge Eating




Why traditional therapy and diets don't work for binge eating




If you have tried to stop binge eating by following conventional methods, such as therapy or diets, you might have been disappointed by the results. You might have felt like you were wasting your time, money, and energy on something that didn't address the root cause of your problem.


The reason why traditional therapy and diets don't work for binge eating is that they focus on the wrong things. They assume that binge eating is a symptom of deeper psychological issues, such as low self-esteem, trauma, stress, or depression. They also assume that binge eating is a result of poor nutrition, lack of knowledge, or lack of discipline. They try to fix these issues by helping you explore your emotions, cope with your triggers, improve your body image, and follow a balanced diet.


However, these methods are not effective for binge eating because they ignore the fact that binge eating is a habit that is driven by a malfunctioning brain. They don't address the real cause of your binge urges: the lower brain. They don't teach you how to recognize and dismiss your binge urges as meaningless and harmless. They don't help you separate your higher brain from your lower brain and use your rational mind to override your irrational impulses. They don't empower you to take control over your own behavior and stop acting on your urges.


In fact, traditional therapy and diets can sometimes make binge eating worse. They can reinforce the idea that you have something wrong with you that needs to be fixed. They can make you feel more guilty, ashamed, and hopeless about your situation. They can also increase your sense of deprivation and restriction, which can trigger more binge urges from your lower brain.


That's why Brain Over Binge offers a different approach. It doesn't try to change who you are or what you feel. It doesn't tell you what to eat or how to eat. It simply teaches you how to change what you do when you have a binge urge. It teaches you how to use your higher brain to dismiss your lower brain and stop binge eating for good.


How to recognize and dismiss your binge urges as neurological junk




The core technique of Brain Over Binge is to recognize and dismiss your binge urges as neurological junk from your lower brain. This technique is simple but powerful. It can help you stop binge eating without any external intervention or assistance.


The first step is to recognize your binge urges. A binge urge is a strong desire to eat a large amount of food in a short period of time, regardless of hunger, fullness, or consequences. A binge urge is different from normal hunger or appetite. Normal hunger or appetite is a natural and healthy signal that your body needs nourishment. Normal hunger or appetite can be satisfied by eating a reasonable amount of food that meets your nutritional needs. A binge urge is an unnatural and unhealthy signal that your lower brain wants more food than you need. A binge urge cannot be satisfied by eating any amount of food; it only leads to more binge urges.


The second step is to dismiss your binge urges. To dismiss a binge urge means to ignore it, reject it, or let it go without acting on it. To dismiss a binge urge means to realize that it has no power over you, unless you give it power by believing it or obeying it. To dismiss a binge urge means to understand that it is not a part of you, but a part of your lower brain that is malfunctioning due to habit and conditioning.


To dismiss a binge urge effectively, you need to use your higher brain. Your higher brain is the part of your brain that can think rationally, logically, and critically. Your higher brain can see the big picture and evaluate the consequences of your actions. Your higher brain can also learn new habits and rewire the lower brain over time.


When you have a binge urge, use your higher brain to remind yourself of the following facts:



  • Your binge urge is not a true need or want; it is just a faulty message from your lower brain.



  • Your binge urge does not mean anything about you or your situation; it is just a result of habit and conditioning.



  • Your binge urge does not have any power over you; it is just an impulse that you can choose to ignore or reject.



  • Your binge urge does not have any benefit for you; it only leads to more binge urges and more problems.



  • Your binge urge does not have to be acted on; it will pass if you let it be.



By using your higher brain to dismiss your binge urges, you will stop giving them attention and importance. You will stop reinforcing the neural pathways that trigger binge eating. You will stop feeding the lower brain and start starving it. Eventually, your binge urges will become weaker and less frequent, until they disappear altogether.


How to separate your higher brain from your lower brain




Another important technique of Brain Over Binge is to separate your higher brain from your lower brain. This technique can help you create a mental distance between yourself and your binge urges. It can also help you avoid falling into the trap of rationalizing or justifying your binge urges.


To separate your higher brain from your lower brain, you need to use a simple but powerful tool: language. Language can help you shape your thoughts and influence your behavior. Language can also help you identify which part of your brain is speaking to you at any given moment.


When you have a binge urge, use language to label it as coming from your lower brain. For example, you can say to yourself: "This is just my lower brain sending me a binge urge." Or: "This is not me, this is my lower brain talking." Or: "This is just neurological junk from my lower brain."


By using language to label your binge urges as coming from your lower brain, you will create a clear distinction between yourself and your urges. You will realize that you are not your urges, and that your urges are not your true desires. You will also prevent yourself from making excuses or arguments for bingeing, such as: "I deserve this." Or: "I need this." Or: "I can't help this."


These excuses or arguments are not coming from your higher brain, but from your lower brain. Your lower brain is trying to trick you into believing that bingeing is good for you, or that you have no choice but to binge. Your lower brain is trying to persuade you to give in to its demands and feed its habit.


Don't fall for it. Don't listen to your lower brain. Don't engage with it or argue with it. Just label it as what it is: a malfunctioning part of your brain that is sending you false and harmful signals.


How to develop a healthy relationship with food and yourself




The final technique of Brain Over Binge is to develop a healthy relationship with food and yourself. This technique can help you heal from the damage caused by binge eating and dieting. It can also help you prevent future relapses and maintain your recovery.


To develop a healthy relationship with food and yourself, you need to do two things: eat adequately and treat yourself kindly.


To eat adequately means to eat enough food to meet your physical and mental needs. It means to eat when you are hungry, stop when you are full, and enjoy what you eat. It means to eat a variety of foods that provide you with energy, nutrients, and pleasure. It means to eat without guilt, fear, or shame.


To eat adequately, you need to listen to your body and trust its signals. You need to respect your hunger and honor your appetite. You need to reject the idea that some foods are good and some foods are bad. You need to stop counting calories, measuring portions, or following rules. You need to stop dieting and start eating normally.


To treat yourself kindly means to accept yourself as you are and appreciate yourself for who you are. It means to love yourself unconditionally and compassionately. It means to respect yourself and value yourself. It means to take care of yourself and nurture yourself.


To treat yourself kindly, you need to change the way you talk to yourself and think about yourself. You need to stop criticizing yourself, judging yourself, or blaming yourself. You need to stop comparing yourself, competing with yourself, or punishing yourself. You need to start complimenting yourself, encouraging yourself, and forgiving yourself. You need to start celebrating yourself, supporting yourself, and rewarding yourself.


By eating adequately and treating yourself kindly, you will develop a healthy relationship with food and yourself. You will nourish your body and mind with what they need and deserve. You will heal your wounds and scars from binge eating and dieting. You will build your confidence and self-esteem. You will enhance your happiness and well-being.


The Benefits and Challenges of Brain Over Binge




What are the advantages of following Brain Over Binge?




What are the advantages of following Brain Over Binge?




Brain Over Binge has many advantages over other methods of treating binge eating disorders. Some of the main advantages are:



  • It is simple and straightforward. You don't need to learn complicated theories or techniques. You just need to understand the basic concepts and principles of Brain Over Binge and apply them consistently.



  • It is effective and fast. You don't need to spend months or years in therapy or counseling. You can start seeing results in a matter of days or weeks. You can stop binge eating for good in a matter of months.



  • It is empowering and liberating. You don't need to rely on anyone or anything else to stop binge eating. You have the power and the freedom to choose your own behavior and change your own brain. You are the master of your own destiny.



  • It is flexible and adaptable. You don't need to follow a rigid plan or schedule. You can adapt Brain Over Binge to your own preferences and circumstances. You can use it anytime, anywhere, and with any type of food.



  • It is holistic and sustainable. You don't need to sacrifice any aspect of your health or happiness to stop binge eating. You can improve your physical, mental, and emotional well-being at the same time. You can enjoy food and life without fear or guilt.



Brain Over Binge is not a miracle cure or a magic bullet. It is not a one-size-fits-all solution or a quick fix. It is not a guarantee of success or a promise of perfection. It is a practical and realistic approach that can help you overcome binge eating and live a better life.


What are the potential drawbacks or difficulties of Brain Over Binge?




Brain Over Binge is not without its challenges or limitations. Some of the potential drawbacks or difficulties of following this approach are:



  • It requires commitment and consistency. You need to be willing and able to apply Brain Over Binge every time you have a binge urge, no matter how strong or frequent they are. You need to be persistent and patient until your binge urges disappear completely.



  • It requires courage and confidence. You need to be brave and confident enough to face your binge urges head-on, without avoiding them or escaping from them. You need to be bold and assertive enough to dismiss your binge urges, without giving in to them or negotiating with them.



  • It requires awareness and attention. You need to be aware and attentive enough to recognize your binge urges as soon as they arise, without ignoring them or denying them. You need to be mindful and focused enough to dismiss your binge urges as soon as you notice them, without distracting yourself or procrastinating.



It requires support and resources. You might need some help and guidance from others who have followed Brain Over Binge or who understand its principles. You might also need some information and tools from books, websites, podcasts, blogs, or cour


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